Tag Archives : review


Notes on POST/CAPITALISM: The Base and The Superstructure

POST/CAPITALISM by Colestia (a.k.a David Cribb) is, in short, an inverted resource management sim . Or, it might be more accurate to describe as a kind of socialist SimCity, as Heather Alexandra did at Kotaku. Both approach the underpinning ethic of the game, which, unlike most games of the genre, doesn’t take hours upon hours to complete. This […]


Notes on It’s As If You Were Doing Work: Do Nothing, Feel Fine

Pippin Barr’s It’s As If You Were Doing Work is a browser game set in the near-future, when robots will have finally and completely replaced the human labour force. The speculative browser game satirizes the interface of a Windows 95-era workplace desktop, complete with the operating system sound effects. Through the medium of a desktop UI simulation, […]


Notes on Military-Industrial Complex: Finger on the Button

REPVBLIC’s Military-Industrial Complex attempts to pull off the notoriously difficult task of creating a trenchant, coherent and funny political satire in the context of a videogame. It resembles, in some ways, a Mason Lindroth game: aesthetically, it reflects that grainy black-and-white palette and texture typical of Lindroth, but in more of a topical, pop art […]


Notes on An Evening of Modern Dance: Deliberate Gestures

Joseph Parker’s An Evening of Modern Dance presents itself, at least at first glance, with all the self-serious trappings of the real form on which it’s based. The stage before you is dark, stark, with a mise en scène that’s empty save for the dancers and the spotlights trained on them. There’s a classic red curtain and an apron, and the wall-to-wall smoothness of Unity textures make the place feel unreal, serene, and ghostly, as if carved from clay and finely sanded.